For me, business-ready and business casual fashion has always been reminiscent of beige pantsuits and boring pencil skirts. It never seemed fun or inventive, and it didn’t seem like you were able to show your personality through your clothes once you entered the workforce. Maggy London, a clothing company that primarily targets white-collar workers, features “business appropriate” but still unique and colorful fashions, and showcases the future of cute but still suitable office-ready outfits. However, despite the company’s outward appearance and messaging of female empowerment through clothing, all isn’t quite what it seems to be behind the scenes.

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Most generations have a playground trend, like kendamas or silly bands, that spread through schools like a wildfire. Millennials in America were obsessed with beaded crafts, from lizard shaped keychains, friendship bracelets to handmade purses that could barely hold a wallet. Every kid either beaded or knew someone who did. And like most of these typical kids’ crafting trends, it was expected to be nothing but a nostalgic memory once you left school. But, fashion designer Susan Alexandra refused to let the fun, vibrant appeal of this craft go to waste. 

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Fashion is an artistic business that’s hard to be objective about. It is virtually impossible to not form an opinion on, and it comes with more than its fair share of skeletons in the closet. Fashion requires models to adhere to rigorous body regimens, limited diets, and maintain a short shelf life; previous fashion model Stella Duval told the New York Times, “I see models who are 13, 14, 15. I’ve had someone tell me that she hadn’t eaten for two days because she didn’t know where to go to eat. I saw girls doing lingerie at 14.”

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When fashion brands make headlines, the conversation is usually focused on celebrities, whether in the fashion business or not, and new, exorbitantly priced collections. So much so that the idea of fashion seems completely inaccessible or elitist to a lot of people who are not already invested. However, when a brand finds the right balance between an elite image and affordability, they often become staple brands for the casual fashion enthusiast. Guillermo Andrade seems to have struck this balance with his brand 424 on Fairfax.

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In our mass-produced, capitalistic society, hand-crafted products can seem like relics from the past. However, for Loewe, a Spanish luxury fashion company, this appreciation, and respect for the history of hand-crafted, unique clothing defines the brand.

Dating back to 1846, this 174-year-old fashion house has stood the test of time. Loewe was created by a group of unnamed artisans from Madrid until German craftsman Enrique Loewe Roessberg joined these craftsmen to develop the fashion house’s name and brand. 

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Fashion is so often associated with clean lines and simple colors, and in a world of cheaply made outfits with little sustainability and no heart that went into their production, it’s hard to find long-lasting clothing that is also chic. However, Los Angeles-based Illustrator and Fashion Designer Tuesday Bassen takes typical ideas of modern fashion, that of limited sizes and non-sustainable production, Bassen’s background in illustration allows her to not only make unique pins and patches, but her clothing designs are also original.

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