Johnny Depp is a man of many faces -- close to fifty, in fact.  The roles that he plays are just as varied. He can be seen swaying drunkenly atop a pirate ship, trimming hedges with hands constructed of scissors, as a possibly disturbed entrepreneur of a chocolate factory and he has also lent his voice to an animated, soon-to-be husband of a corpse.  Depp has made a name for himself working in the bizarre, straying from the Hollywood scene to turn out work that has made him into an iconic star.

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“The reason why it’s so important for Honey Pot to do well is so the next Black girl that comes up with a great idea, she can have a better opportunity. That means a lot to me,” said Beatrice Dixon, founder of the Honey Pot Company, when describing the vision behind her plant-based feminine care line, in a Target commercial, highlighting Black entrepreneurs. 

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Let’s face it, NASCAR is one sport where diversity hasn’t been the focal point. From the drivers to the owners, and even the fans, dating back to its 1948 inception, The National Association for Stock Car Racing has had very few professionals of color. Historically there were hardly any pit crew members, even fewer drivers, and until recently there were no black-owned NASCAR racing teams.

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Any faithful viewers of Donald Glover’s Emmy-award-winning TV show Atlanta know that the titular city was built on, and continues to be fueled by the contributions of African Americans. From politics to infrastructure, to music and food, Atlanta is Black and proud, and that pride can now extend to a new industry: Technology. The Atlanta-Journal Constitution recently explored the statistical increase in African American participation in the Atlanta tech industry. If this upward trend continues, it seems Atlanta will be well-positioned to become the Black Silicon Valley during the coming decades, or even sooner.

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If you do not believe in the law of attraction, producer-director Matthew Cherry might make you reconsider. If manifesting your dreams was a person then it would be him. In 2012, Cherry tweeted that one day he would win an Oscar. In 2020 that became a reality when he and co-producer Karen Rupert Toliver took home an Oscar award for their film “Hair Love,” a sweet and heartwarming animated short film about an African-American father and his first time doing his daughter’s hair.

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