It’s been almost ten months since George Floyd was murdered as a result of four police officers' blatant disregard for yet another black man's life. It’s been almost a year since the shooting death of 25-year old Ahmaud Arbery by neighbors who felt that him jogging in his own neighborhood was suspicious. It’s been over a year since Breonna Taylor was shot to death by police officers while she slept in her Kentucky home. In all three of these instances and many more which have not made headlines, no charges were initially filed. This did not sit right with black America nor did it appease activist Tamika Mallory who’s managed to articulate the pain that black people are feeling in such a way that it leaves her audience jaw dropped every single time she speaks.

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From the age of fourteen, South Korean sensation Shin Min-a has created and maintained a name for herself in the entertainment industry. From gracing the covers of notable magazines to starring in feature films, Shin Min-a is the epitome of a well-rounded entertainer. Since her discovery in 1998, when she submitted a photo at a picnic to KiKi Magazine and landed a spot on the cover at the age of fourteen, Shin Min-a has moved on to more prestigious modeling roles. In 2009, she starred alongside Jamie Dornan in a photoshoot for Calvin Klein pictured in magazine Elle Korea, and most recently, Shin Min-a is the cover star for Elle Singapore’s February issue. 

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Words are powerful. Words are strong. Words have the ability to enact change and uplift people. America has given birth to some powerful poets in the past such as Maya Angelou and Robert Frost; both of whom can attest to the magnetic force that words can have on a group of people. 

But when poetic words come from a 22-year old author and poet who dreams of running for president in 2036, they leave behind a monumental, nostalgic moment that can never truly be forgotten.

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“Embrace the glorious mess that you are.” 

Judging by these words, you would consider a mess to be an entity that’s considered to be “disorderly” or “unorganized.” However, these very words spoken by Elizabeth Gilbert, journalist and best-selling author of Eat, Pray, Love, are just as affirming as the “mess” that created the company, “Mess in a Bottle.” Upon hearing those words, some people would actually think there’s a “mess” in a bottle, but that’s not the case. “Mess” is shortened for the word “message,” as in the affirming messages that are printed on many of the company’s products. 

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There was a survey circulating the internet towards the end of the year, asking people what place have they missed going to the most during the Covid-19 restrictions? I had three; museums, bowling alleys, and the show, aka the movie theater. I’m an avid museum-goer, bowler, and have gotten into movies a little more nowadays. One of the reasons I’ve become more interested in movies is because of the diversity of Black stories that are being told now. Part of the diversity stems from the fact, we as Black people are telling our own stories, whereas in the past they were being told from other people’s perspectives. From the likes of Lena Waithe and Ava Duvernay, to Ryan Coogler, Jordan Peele, and Nate Parker, they each have brought a unique way of Black storytelling to TV and the movie screen. Nate Parker seems to be the rebel of the bunch, and his latest film, “American Skin,” is a great depiction of where he stands. 

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