When discussing important figures in the African-American community, people that come to mind are often associated with a celebrity or ‘fame’ status and their efforts to give back to their community,  names like Lebron James and his “I Promise School,” which provides schooling to more than 1,300 Akron Public School students, or Chance the Rapper who co-founded SocialWorks, a foundation which has raised more than $2 million for Chicago Public Schools. Both have done incredible things for their communities, however, oftentimes overlooked are those lesser-known individuals who have accomplished so much with the resources they have been given.  

Introducing: Karim Webb, an LA based restaurateur whose passion for food and giving back to the community has earned him multiple awards including Black Enterprise Magazine’s Franchise Company of the Year.

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In 2018, a study was conducted across 820,000 art exhibitions that were public and commercial sectors, discovering that only one-third of the museums and galleries featured women artists. Further, a data analysis of 18 major art museums found their collections are 87% male and 85% white. Simply put, women artists and photographers have had to consistently fight for recognition.

The High Museum of Art created an exhibit called “Underexposed” to shed light on diverse female photographers throughout history. 

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Professional sports have never been there to care for the players that bring them such large amounts of money and attention; from the chronic traumatic encephalopathy in professional football to severely underpaying the WNBA and the Women’s National Soccer Team. Aspects of athletics that are not frequently in the conversation are physical health, aftereffects of a professional career, or work-life balance, let alone the mental health of current athletes in their prime. Recently, tennis star Naomi Osaka has been the feature of news due to her refusal to do press for the French Open, and her ultimate withdrawal from the tournament and announcement of a hiatus from the sport.

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What’s your favorite horror movie series? I have two, The Amityville Horrors and most recently Insidious. I’ve always loved horror movies. When I was a kid, I loved the thrill of getting scared. 

The nightmares, though? 

That part was trash, but it never prevented me from checking out the next haunting or creepy movie. I’m more interested in the paranormal and possession movies, they seem more believable to me. It’s also a bonus if the film is based on a true story. The Conjuring series checks all of those boxes, and has done a good job at depicting what’s reported to be real-life events. So with the most recent film, The Conjuring 3: The Devil Made Me Do It, I was fully on board to check it out. 

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“The idea of a Japanese comedian was not only a rarity, it was non-existent.” -Pat Morita.

The late Noriyuki Morita was the embodiment of an entertainer and knew exactly how to get a laugh from any audience. His love for comedy and performing in front of audiences led him to become one of the most beloved actors of the past century. However, often overlooked is the uphill battle that Morita faced not only with alcohol abuse but also as an Asian-American actor in early Hollywood cinema. With a career spanning from the 1960s to the early 2000s, Morita experienced first-hand the various racist and stereotypical portrayals of Asian people in American television and film. 

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