There's been a lot of discussion about whether or not it's an athlete's place to stand up for sociopolitical issues. Some people feel it's not their place, while others feel it's their obligation given the fact that their platform allows them to be able to reach the masses unlike the average citizen. There's been talks of possibly tainting their legacy, but taking a look at history, the athletes who did fight for issues particularly black athletes, they're often held on a higher pedestal. From Jim Brown, to Bill Russell, To Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, their stance arguably made them more important historical figures. The same can be said for John Carlos and Tommie Smith who's black leather gloved fists remain one of the Olympics most memorable moments. And of course we remember the late great Muhammad Ali and his refusal to fight in Vietnam, and being incarcerated in his prime because of that. This football season, in addition to all of the eagerness to watch what's happening on the field and keeping track of your fantasy stats, there will be more attention than usual placed on a few guys while still on the sidelines. One of which is Colin Kaepernick.

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Cultural awareness is something that many black people are deprived of. It's always been a touchy subject, and a tough one to explain the answers to all of the who's, how's, and why's. Questions like: How did things get like this? Who's responsible for allowing these things to continue to happen? What are some plausible solutions to ending this systematic oppression? Since 2011, Tariq Nasheed has assembled a team of esteemed scholars and historians to breakdown nearly every imaginable facet of life in which the system has been designed to create the conditions that many of us either see on a daily basis or grew up seeing. Tariq wasn't always the conscious brother that we know him to be presently. There was a progression of learning experiences that happened over time that woke him up. Tariq was born in Detroit, Mich., before moving to Alabama where he remained until the age of 17. Growing up in the south was a bit slow, so he started traveling the world and studying other cultures and customs, specifically how people interacted in relationships. What better place to get a good feel for multicultural studies than Los Angeles?

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Often times hip-hop purists talk about how much the music has changed. How it's watered down, or it's too vulgar, and all that other "get off my lawn" talk that the old heads always inform the younger generation about. I myself have been and still am guilty of not taking a liking to most of the new hip-hop music that’s on rotation today. I'm pretty sure a ton of my contacts have gone ahead and put the old, light skinned man emoji next to my name in their phones; and I've accepted it. But it really got me to thinking, what exactly is missing from today's hip-hop scene? One of the major differences I've noticed is that the traditional New York lyricists are at an all-time low. Chris Classic, who hails from Brooklyn, is one of the rappers whose name indicates he's bringing back that "classic" New York feel. The artists addresses the routine of attaching labels to rap artists and the tunnel vision of a lot of music lovers in his song "Rudy."

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