It’s not often that I hear new artists that put me in the mindset of that old south, soulful hip-hop. I’m talking about the way you feel when someone like Big K.R.I.T spits on a track, and you can almost smell granny’s collard greens and candied yams on the stove, and hear the grease popping from the fried chicken or catfish in that cast iron skillet. Music artists that would bring you back to a time when you had to drink the water out the hose because you knew if you went back inside, you’d have to stay. You know, before central air was a regular household appliance.

When only granny’s room and the kitchen had A/C, and you weren’t allowed to go in either room and chill. So you’re stuck in the family room with the oscillating fan, trying to sit as close as possible for that 1.75 seconds of cool air. It’s a nostalgic feeling taking me back to some of the best times of my childhood that only certain artists can tap into.  

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The best part of first grade, or any grade after that, was when we used to see the teacher wheeling in the tv/vcr on that black cart. Grant it they had no idea how to use, by the way. But, this action alone that let you know that you were in for a fun day, regardless of what movie was going to be played. The Lion King is one that we watched that’s pretty memorable for me. The range of emotions from beginning to end was something I don’t think any of us who grew up in the 90’s will ever forget. One of the best animated movies I’ve ever seen, even as an adult. And in the era of remakes, it was only right for Disney to remake it and modernize it. 

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'When They See Us," has been the topic of nearly everyone’s conversation over the course of the last two weeks. The Netflix miniseries directed by Ava Duvernay touched on so many important subtopics, it’ll make your head spin. I know that not everyone has had the chance to see it, and some have even chosen not to because of how difficult it is to process the emotions that will be triggered. The story is about five teenage African American and Hispanic boys who were sent to prison after being wrongfully accused and ultimately convicted for a rape and sexual assault of a white woman that they did not commit. As a journalist, one thing that was troubling to watch was the media’s biased coverage of the events. While that part of the series was just a mere subplot,  I couldn’t help but think how unfortunate it was that there was really no fair representation of those young men in the media. That probably wouldn’t have been the case had the North Star been around to speak truth to power. Giving the young men a fair representation in the media, rather than prematurely concluding that they were guilty.

Jharrel Jerome as Korey Wise

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