The undeniable link between graffiti and hip-hop is marked by the culture that was conceived in the Bronx in the 1970s. Since then hip-hop has matured into a prominent artistic culture in America that is arguably something completely different from how it began. Originally consisting of music, graffiti and breakdancing, hip-hop culture has created a platform for urban city dwellers to express themselves and voice their concerns about societal issues. Doze Green, graffiti artist and social commentator, is known as a legend of culture’s uprising.

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Once considered an act of vandalism, graffiti is now widely accepted as a form of art. Though the act of graffiti has ancient roots, modern street art began popping up in urban areas during the 1970s as a means of sociopolitical expression. Silenced by the authorities, street artists were punished for their bold, rebellious artwork. Graffitists attempt to reclaim public space with their paintings, capturing the cultural essence of the environment. While some may view this process as menacing or threatening, many have found the artwork compelling and reflective of urban life. For French artist Noe Two, graffiti is not only a form of self expression, but a communal act that has helped him foster relationships with people from  different backgrounds.

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