Images have the ability to capture the tiniest details, things that people wouldn’t normally see. Photographer Sally Mann captures these themes in her images, instead of just taking a surface level view of society. She uses her artistic skills to approach the hard, taboo topics like: death, immortality, and even racism.  Her photos translate to a thousand crossings, a thousand different journeys, stories, voices, and perspectives.

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It is hard to be vulnerable in today’s society, especially with the negativity surrounding the current state of the nation’s social, economic, and political climates. Most people feel the need to protect themselves and wear a smile covering any hurt that they may feel inside. However, Atlanta artist and curator Eugene V. Byrd III, deconstructs this concept and openly depicts this widespread sense of disconnectedness and sadness in his new exhibit called “Sullen.” Sullen is currently on display at Future Gallery located in Southwest Atlanta, Georgia.

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Hip-hop creators all around the globe have a keen sense of originality and unique beats that make people want to dance, sing, or chant along with raps. California, especially in LA, has a reputation for breeding some of the hottest, legendary, producers of the time such as Ice T  and Kurpt. However, as time progresses, there is always a need for a new type of legendary sound. One producer in particular, though,  has managed to successfully pioneer an entirely new sound of LA.

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Mahatma Gandhi once said, “Be the change you want to see in the world.” With growing social, political, economical, and racial tensions in the U.S., the world needs more individuals who will speak out on the important issues affecting society while also setting a positive example in the world. According to Trevor Noah, comedian, writer, producer, political commentator, actor, and television host, Hasan Minhaj is one of those individuals.

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Imagine that it is the early 2000s and there is a video playing on a television screen called “Supa Dupa Fly,” produced by the hottest musical genius of the time, Timbaland, is bumping in the background. There is a woman dressed in a black, inflated, trash-bag like garment, doing eccentric dance moves. There are background dancers moving to the entrancing hip-hop beat, with flashing lights that one could not miss. The chorus: “Me, I’m supa dupa fly,” is repeated by the rapper, who at the time way ahead of her time. Her larger than life clothing, lyrics, and attitude proved to be a true revelation of who the artist would become.

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