The Storm: It’s something we’ve all seen and experienced, a storm is a part of life but it doesn’t last forever.

The Ark: It provides shelter, protection, and comfort against your darkest days.

The Rainbow: A constant reminder of God’s promise, and the fact that there are better days ahead.

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Longevity in any industry starts with talent, it’s achieved through hard work and the willingness to progress with that talent. As comedian Aries Spears said, “To sustain longevity, you have to evolve.” Dawoud Bey has been a fixture in the world of photography since he got his first camera at age 15. The 67-year-old photographer is widely regarded as one of the most influential artists of his time. The reason he’s been able to have such a great impact is his ability to evolve within his craft. While growth is a very important concept for him to be successful, so is staying grounded and having his work mean something. 

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A typical member of the paparazzi can often be seen chasing down celebrities at literally any cost, taking high risks to capture a person at their best, or in many instances even at their worst.  Bill Cunningham, however, is a different breed of a photographer.  While he is known for his unexpected frames of celebrities and New York’s elite, the eighty-three-year-old fashion and street photographer has continuously earned the distinct respect of those he photographs. 

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When I think of  Jordans or J’s, almost immediately a picture of the classic Air Jordan 1’s pops up in my head, and also the thought of how I can get my hands on a pair of them. Most people can agree that a nice pair of fresh Jordans; with no creases can definitely uplift anyone's mood. When the words ‘art’ and ‘jordans’ show up in the same sentence, it now becomes a little harder to entertain the thought. Brooklyn-based artist Michael Murphy has figured out how to perfectly blend the two together in a way that emphasizes the viewer's perspective; depending on where they are standing in the room.

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One of the most enduring philosophical conversations is Hobbes’ and Rousseau's debate of whether a man is inherently good or inherently evil. This debate can be found – in its purest form – in children. They can be cute, naïve, and innocent, but often equally destructive and cruel. This duality of both good and bad is what defines most of our childhoods, and that duality can be found in the mischievous, yet cherubic children illustrated by Japanese artist Yoshitomo Nara.

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When people think of autism, words like “mute,” or “special needs,” or “withdrawn” tend to get thrown around in a room or you might even hear whispers as if there’s some taboo surrounding the disorder that affects 1 in 160 people or 1% of the world’s population. 

Now, what if I told you that once upon a time there was a mute 5-year-old autistic boy who began communicating with the world through the language of drawing in a way no other child has ever done? Oh yeah, and whose net worth is now 4 million dollars! Stephen Wiltshire is an artist in his own right and he has not let his autism diagnosis get in the way of that.

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