When I think of  Jordans or J’s, almost immediately a picture of the classic Air Jordan 1’s pops up in my head, and also the thought of how I can get my hands on a pair of them. Most people can agree that a nice pair of fresh Jordans; with no creases can definitely uplift anyone's mood. When the words ‘art’ and ‘jordans’ show up in the same sentence, it now becomes a little harder to entertain the thought. Brooklyn-based artist Michael Murphy has figured out how to perfectly blend the two together in a way that emphasizes the viewer's perspective; depending on where they are standing in the room.

You are unauthorized to view this page.

One of the most enduring philosophical conversations is Hobbes’ and Rousseau's debate of whether a man is inherently good or inherently evil. This debate can be found – in its purest form – in children. They can be cute, naïve, and innocent, but often equally destructive and cruel. This duality of both good and bad is what defines most of our childhoods, and that duality can be found in the mischievous, yet cherubic children illustrated by Japanese artist Yoshitomo Nara.

You are unauthorized to view this page.

When people think of autism, words like “mute,” or “special needs,” or “withdrawn” tend to get thrown around in a room or you might even hear whispers as if there’s some taboo surrounding the disorder that affects 1 in 160 people or 1% of the world’s population. 

Now, what if I told you that once upon a time there was a mute 5-year-old autistic boy who began communicating with the world through the language of drawing in a way no other child has ever done? Oh yeah, and whose net worth is now 4 million dollars! Stephen Wiltshire is an artist in his own right and he has not let his autism diagnosis get in the way of that.

You are unauthorized to view this page.

Despite the exhausting abnormality of 2020, this strange year does have its purpose. Instead of being complacent, many artists have found innovative ways to share their creations and visions. 

One rapper in particular, though, was already prepared for this paradigm shift. Making “purpose popular” is Tobe Nwigwe’s simple yet thought-provoking motto. During a time where finding purpose is necessary for mental health, this Nigerian-born, Houston-raised rapper has fans and other artists alike looking to him for encouragement.

You are unauthorized to view this page.